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Bakken Summary

Bakken Summary

The North Dakota area of the Bakken LTO basin has accessible data from the ND Department of Natural Resources, Oil and Gas Division. Production here seems to be past peak and in general decline. The data presented here is therefore more a historical perspective than of much interest in predicting issues that may have significant impact for the future. However it may give some indication on what to expect in the Permian basins, the only ones left in the US that may have capacity to increase production. The Texas RRC does also produce good data but a global data dump produces files that are too big for my computer to handle and splitting into smaller subsets is too man-hour intensive for me to pursue.

Production Across the Area

These charts show how the oil production has changed every three years by range (almost equivalent to lines of longitudes) and township lines (latitudes). These lines run every six miles and the area they contain is called a township, consisting of 36 square mile sections (that’s the simplified explanation, earth’s curvature and irregular land features make things a bit more complicated).

The production shapes indicate that there aren’t core (tier 1) areas with surrounding poorer quality areas. There is a single, small central peak area (I think geologists might call this a bright spot) and the reservoir quality declines steadily to the edges of the basin, outside of which there is no meaningful production and never will be no matter what oil prices, technology improvements or USGS fantasies come along.

The chart below shows the production over the whole area for April 2021, looking towards the north-west…

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

US April Oil Production Flat

US April Oil Production Flat

All of the oil (C + C) production data for the US state charts comes from the EIAʼs Petroleum Supply monthly PSM. After the production charts, an analysis of three EIA monthly reports that project future production is provided. The charts below are updated to April 2021 for the 10 largest US oil producing states.

U.S. April production was essentially flat. It decreased by 19 kb/d to 11,169 kb/d from Marchʼs output of 11,188 kb/d. It was also 113 kb/d higher than January’s.

The June STEO report forecasted US April output would be 11,082 kb/d vs the reported actual output for April of 11,169 kb/d, an under estimate of 87 kb/d. 

In the onshore lower 48, April production increased by 80 kb/d, red graph. The 99 kb/d difference between the US’ decrease and the On-shore L48’s increase was largely due to the 92 kb/d decrease from the GOM.

Ranking Production from US States

Listed above are the 10 states with the largest US production. These 10 accounted for 80.8% of US production out of a total production of 11,169 kb/d in April 2021. 

On a MoM basis, the largest barrel increases came from Colorado, Texas and New Mexico. On a YoY basis, all states except New Mexico and Utah had a lower output than last year. Note also that New Mexico’s output surpassed North Dakota and moved into second place.

Production by State

Texas production increased by 28 kb/d in April to 4,791 kb/d.  In the EIA’s June report, March’s output was revised up by 18 kb/d from 4,745 kb/d to 4,763 kb/d.

In April there were close to 194 oil rigs operation in Texas. By the fourth week of June 25, 201 were operating. From the end of April to the week of June 25, Texas added 7 oil rigs. It appears that the rate of adding rigs in Texas has slowed. See Rig chart in Section 4 further down.

April’s New Mexico production increased by 17 kb/d to 1,172 kb/d. April’s output is a new record.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Annual Reserve Revisions Part IV: Shale Producers

Annual Reserve Revisions Part IV: Shale Producers

EIA Liquids Reserve Estimates

This follows on from Part I, which looked at EIA reserves and revision estimates for US as a whole and the GoM, and concentrates on the on-shore tight oil and (below)gas producing regions.

The EIA issues revision data by whole states or state districts rather than by basin, so some of the reserves and production, but a small proportion, will be from conventional reservoirs. It does give total reserves for each shale basin but not the changes, and I didn’t go to the trouble of pro-rating everything against that. Its data only goes through 2019; the 2020 update will be out in December or January.

The regions for each basins used are Permian – Texas Districts 7C, 8 and 8A and East New Mexico; Bakken –  North Dakota and Montana; Eagle Ford – Texas Districts 1, 2, 3 and 4 Onshore; Niobara –  Colorado; Marcelus – Pennsylvania and West Virginia; Utica –  Ohio; Haynesville – Louisiana South Onshore and Texas District 6; Barnett – Texas Districts 5, 7B and 9; Woodford – Oklahoma ; Fayetteville – Arkansas.

Remaining reserves are for crude, condensate and NGL, which is easier to include here given the way EIA presents its data. Totalled for all the basins these may have peaked in 2019, they were levelling off from 2018 and will certainly fall significantly in 2020.

Production was aggressively increasing in 2019, coming mainly from the Permian, but will fall in 2020, and given shale dynamics, a concurrent peak with reserves is not unlikely.

Cumulative adjustments and revisions turned negative in 2019 and I expect will show a major decline for 2020, which may well not be fully recovered even if prices rise significantly. To me this indicates that estimates for recovery factors were over-estimated originally and are gradually being corrected…

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Annual Reserve Revisions Part III: Larger Independents

Annual Reserve Revisions Part III: Larger Independents

The story here is of a gradual decline in the size and importance of most of these (once) large independents. Their combined reserves and production is not sizeable compared to the super majors and majors but their history may be indicative of what is coming the way of the larger companies. All but one of these companies is American owned. Most have or had holdings in shale or oil sands but many have sold off most of these and chosen to concentrate on a shrinking core business. There is probably a fuller picture to see if their financial performances, such as debt loads or share buy back schemes, were also considered but that’s a bigger job than I’m prepared for or capable of.

For the reserves charts the right hand axis shows liquid (green) and gas (red) replacement ratio with the organic ratios and their trend lines as solid lines and total ratios, including trades, as diamond markers.

On the the production charts I have not shown R/P for the oil sands production (nor the replacement ratio on the reserves chart) as for the small producers it tends to whizz about all over the place as prices change, but see the future post on Canada and oil sands for some more details.

On the revision summary charts I have not shown the cumulative trades (acquisitions/dispositions) or adjustments and revisions if they go negative, as the charts are complicated enough as they are, though really colourful, which is what I mostly go for. However, in such cases, I have shown the final figure in the legend.

ConocoPhilips (COP)

In the last fifteen years, pretty much since its inception in the merger of 2002, COP has lost over half of its reserves, averaged below 100% replacement ratio (and falling) and seen production half…

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

US March Oil Production Rebounds Strongly From Winter Storm Low

US March Oil Production Rebounds Strongly From Winter Storm Low

All of the oil (C + C) production data for the US state charts comes from the EIAʼs Petroleum Supply monthly PSM. The charts below are updated to March 2021 for the 10 largest US oil producing states.

U.S. March production increased by 1,401 kb/d to 11,184 kb/d from Februaryʼs output of 9,783 kb/d and was also 128 kb/d higher than January’s. The increase was due to the rebound from the severe winter storm that hit the four US southern states, Texas, New Mexico, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Note that February’s output of 9,862 kb/d in the previous report was revised down by 79 kb/d to 9,783 kb/d in the current report.

The May STEO report forecasted US March output would be 10,939 kb/d vs the reported actual output for March of 11,184, an under estimate of 245 kb/d. Note that March output was 57 kb/d higher than January.

In the onshore lower 48, March production increased by 1,298 kb/d, red graph. The 103 kb/d difference between the two was largely due to the 107 kb/d increase from the GOM.

Ranking Production from US States

Listed above are the 10 states with the largest US production. These 10 accounted for (79.8%) of US production out of a total production of 11,184 kb/d in March 2021. 

Of these 10 states, Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma had the biggest percentage output increases relative to February. On a YoY basis, all states except New Mexico had a lower output than last year. Note also that New Mexico surpassed North Dakota in output and moved into second place.

Rig additions continued in the US from the August low of 172 to 359 in the last week of May. Over the last month there is a hint of slowing in rig additions in Texas and the Permian.

Frac spreads continue to increase at an average rate of close to 15.1/mth. 

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

  BakkenGulf of MexicoNon-OPEC productionTexasUS Oil Production, peak oil barrel, 

January Non-OPEC Oil Production Climbs Again

January Non-OPEC Oil Production Climbs Again

Below are a number of oil (C + C ) production charts for Non-OPEC countries created from data provided by the EIAʼs International Energy Statistics and updated to January 2021. Information from other sources such as OPEC, the STEO and country specific sites such as Russia, Norway and China is used to provide a short term outlook for future output and direction for a few countries and the world.

Non-OPEC production continued to climb from the May 2020 low of 45,272 kb/d. January’s output increased by 448 kb/d to 48,862 kb/d from December. The January increase was primarily driven by output increases from Brazil (147 kb/d) and China (164 kb/d). From May 2020 to January 2021, production increased by a total of 3,590 kb/d or an average of close to 450 kb/d/mth.

Using data from the April 2021 STEO, a projection for Non-OPEC output was made to December 2022 (red graph). Output is expected to reach 52,064 kb/d, which is lower than the previous high of December 2019, by close to 500 kb/d. February 2021 output is projected to drop by 1,534 kb/d due to the disruption caused by the major snow storm in the L48 U.S. states.

Ranking Production from NON-OPEC Countries

Above are listed the worldʼs 11th largest Non-OPEC producers. They produced 83.6% of the Non-OPEC output in January. On a YoY basis, Non-OPEC production decreased by 3,601 kb/d while on a MoM basis, production increased by 448 kb/d to 48,862 kb/d. World YoY output is down by 6,906 kb/d. As noted above, the January increase was primarily driven by output increases from Brazil (147 kb/d), China (164 kb/d) and Russia (111 kb/d), countries with the largest monthly increases.

The EIA reported Brazilʼs January production increased by 147 kb/d to 2,873 kb/d.

According to this source February’s output dropped by 8% from January to 2,730 kb/d and then recovered to 2,844 kb/d in March, according to this source (Red Markers).

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

OPEC Update, March 2021

OPEC Update, March 2021

The OPEC Monthly Oil Market Report for March 2021 was published this past week. The last month reported in each of the charts that follow is February 2021 and output reported for OPEC nations is crude oil output in thousands of barrels per day (kb/d). The numbers at the left side of the graphs show February 2021 output (and in some cases the trailing 12 month average output).

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OPEC crude output decreased by 647 kb/d in February 2021, total OPEC crude output for January 2021 was not revised from last month’s report. Most of the decrease in OPEC output was due to a cutback in Saudi Arabia’s output by 930 kb/d from January to February 2021.

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Dennis Coyne, OPEC, oil , oil production, peak oil barrel

OPEC Update, February 2020

OPEC Update, February 2020

The OPEC Monthly Oil Market Report for January 2020 was published this past week. The last month reported in each of the charts that follow is January 2021 and output reported for OPEC nations is crude oil output in thousands of barrels per day (kb/d).

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Figure 2

OPEC crude output increased by 181 kb/d in January 2021, December 2020 output was revised down from last month’s report by 47 kb/d.

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…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

US January Production Drops Again

US January Production Drops Again

Preparing this March post has been a surrealistic exercise. Here I am providing a January US production update when at a time, January, the world had no clue that it was going to be hit with a double Black Swan event in early March . There was a hint in January on the coming pandemic for those who were listening. However, there was no clue of the Shock and Awe attack that would be launched by SA after Putin and his Oily Oligarch friend Sechin made the wrong move in the world’s Oil Chess Game. Russia thought that they had SA in Check, instead Russia and the rest of world were End Played. Now, a way must be found out of this mess. Reports are circulating that Trump and Putin have been talking and that an OPEC + meeting will be convened shortly. Let’s hope adult’s come to the table.

The silver lining, if there is one, is that the world will need lower oil prices to come out of the current economic slowdown. The question is, if an agreement can be brokered between US, Russia and OPEC, “What will be the right price for oil for both the producers and the economy?

The irony here is that Trump will be holding meetings with oil company executives shortly to see how the US can help. In the meantime the NOPEC (No Oil Producing and Exporting Cartels Act) bill keeps circulating within Congress. Interesting how the world, US positions and thinking, can be flipped upside down over night. 

All of the oil production data for the US states comes from the EIAʼs Petroleum Supply Monthly. At the end, an analysis of a three different EIA reports is provided.

The charts below are updated to January 2020 for the 10 largest US oil producing states (Production > 100 kb/d).

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

EIA’s Electric Power Monthly – September 2019 Edition with data for July

EIA’s Electric Power Monthly – September 2019 Edition with data for July

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The EIA released the latest edition of their Electric Power Monthly on September 24th, with data for July 2019. The table above shows the percentage contribution of the main fuel sources to two decimal places for the last two months and the year 2019 to date.

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The Table immediately above shows the absolute amounts of electricity generated in gigawatt-hours by the main sources for the last two months and the year to date. In July the absolute amount of electricity generated increased, as is usual for the month of July when compared to June for the period covered by the charts, January 2013 to date. Coal and Natural Gas between them, fueled 66.92% of US electricity generation in July. The contribution of zero carbon and carbon neutral sources declined from 37.86% in June to 32.25% in July.

The 12,055 GWh generated by Solar in July 2019 is a record, exceeding the previous record of 11,8549 GWh, set in the previous month, June 2019. It is possible that the output from solar in August could exceed the output in July as was the case in 2014 and 2015. While the percentage contribution from solar did not decline between the months of May and June it declined slightly in July 2019 as is customary when the total amount generated ramps up heading into the midsummer peak. The increase in production from solar has not continued to keep pace with the total increase in generation from June to July. However, as solar capacity continues to increase, in future years it can be expected that the contribution from solar will keep pace with the total and eventually increase going into the summer months.

The graph below shows the absolute monthly production from the various sources since January 2013, as well as the total amount generated (right axis).

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 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

OPEC August 2019 Oil Production

OPEC August 2019 Oil Production

The OPEC charts below were produced from data published in the OPEC Monthly Oil Market Report.

The OPEC 14 was up 136,000 barrels per day in August.
Nothing happening in Algeriaexcept a slow decline.
Ditto for Angola.

 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Climate Variability vs AGW

Climate Variability vs AGW

Emissions of CO2 from burning fossil fuel contributes significantly to a gradual increase in the world’s average temperature.  What’s also known but less understood is the erratic variation in the average temperature due to cycles in the ocean, resulting in episodes of El Nino and La Nina.  Some claim that these temperature extremes are well-understood as a result of changes in the trade winds, as the wind pushes the water around the Pacific ocean, exposing colder or warmer water to the surface. This may have been a perfectly acceptable explanation, except it doesn’t address what causes the wind to vary — in other words the source of the erratic wind variation is just as unknown. 

So we are still left with no root cause for the ocean cycles. Apart from the strictly seasonal changes we have no explanation for the longer-term pattern of natural variation observed. 

The likely key to a physical understanding rests in solving the fluid dynamics of the ocean. There are two aspects to this that have long presented an intellectual challenge. The first challenge has been to model the sloshing dynamics of a huge body of water — this typically involves numerical calculation in the form of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The second challenge is to feed in a possible forcing and see if that can match the cyclic patterns observed. This requires a search through plausible physical mechanisms. Complicating matters is that the cycles may be chaotic so that any agreement we find would be useless from a practical standpoint, as chaotic patterns are impossible to model regardless of the source forcing.

 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

USA and World Oil Production

USA and World Oil Production

The USA data below was taken primarily from the EIA’s Petroleum Supply Monthly while some were taken from the EIA’s Monthly Energy Review.

I have some bad news to report. The EIA no longer published World production data or Non-OPEC production data. This data had previously been published in the Monthly Energy Review.

The Monthly Energy Review’s data was one month behind the Petroleum Supply Monthly but now they jumped two months and are now one month ahead of the Petroleum Supply Monthly. They now publish the previous month’s numbers, June in this case, but now publish only US data. The Petroleum Supply Monthly is unchanged.

EDIT: The Petroleum Supply Monthly does publish some, incomplete, world data… through April or one month behind their USA data. I will use that with an explanation and comments next month.

The closest I can come to World oil production, through June, is the combined production of OPEC, Russia, the USA, and Canada. This is 70% of total World Production.

Here is the other 30% of World oil production. However, this data is only through March. Unfortunately, I can never update this chart because the EIA no longer publishes the data

This 30% of World oil production peaked in late 2015 and has declined an average of 450,000 barrels per day per year every year since.

Actually, in 2015 these countries averaged about 32% of World oil production but now averages about 29%.

I have no other source for World oil production. The IEA publishes quarterly projected data for the World and Non-OPEC. But this data is total liquids and only quarterly projections that bears little resemblance to actual C+C production.

 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

OPEC May Production Data

The below charts, unless otherwise noted, were taken from the OPEC Monthly Oil Market Report. The data is through May, 2019 and is in thousand barrels per day.

OPEC crude only production was down 236,000 barrels per day in May but that was after April production had been revised upward by 82,000 bpd.

Iranian April production was revised upward by 43,000 bpd and Saudi Arabia April production was revised upward by 24,000 bpd.

 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

EIA tight oil estimates

EIA tight oil estimates

The US Energy Information Administration publishes Tight Oil Production Estimates by Play each month (can be found at link above.)  I noticed this month that the estimates seemed different than I remembered so I checked earlier estimates I had saved on my computer.  The chart below compares estimates from Dec 2018 to April 2019 (where the last month of data in the estimate is Dec 2018, Feb 2019, March 2019, and April 2019).

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As is clear from the chart the February and March estimates have each been revised lower over the past two updates. If this should continue, we might see relatively flat tight oil output for all of 2019.

I have revised my estimate for future US tight oil output to a 400+/-100 kb/d increase in monthly average tight oil output from December 2018 to December 2019.

Olduvai IV: Courage
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Olduvai II: Exodus
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