Home » Environment » Duterte Exposes The Difference Between Homegrown Environmentalism And a Neo-Colonial Green Movement

Olduvai
Click on image to purchase

Olduvai III: Catacylsm
Click on image to purchase

Post categories

Duterte Exposes The Difference Between Homegrown Environmentalism And a Neo-Colonial Green Movement

Duterte Exposes The Difference Between Homegrown Environmentalism And a Neo-Colonial Green Movement

President Duterte’s record on the domestic environment is arguably the best of any modern Filipino leader. His project to clean up Manila Bay has seen a once heavily polluted body of water return to a place of beauty whilst just over a year after closing the tourist island of Boracay, it is once again open to visitors who must now abide be regulations that strictly prohibit polluting the natural beauty of the picturesque destination. Duterte has likewise delivered when it comes to cleaning up once filthy rivers and canals throughout the country.

From improving air quality to removing rubbish, scum and chemicals from rivers and creeks, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has not just removed the criminal element from the streets but he is overseeing a revival of the beautiful natural environment of The Philippines that has for decades been neglected. In this sense, when Duterte pledged to deliver “clean government” upon taking office in 2016, he was speaking both metaphorically and literally.

But while Duterte’s genuine environmental credentials have scarcely been reported outside of The Philippines, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is often described as a champion of green policies. His record however shows that for whatever he may be doing to bring green policies (including increased taxation) to Canada’s icy tundras, his policies have come at the expense of the environment in The Philippines.

One of the great misnomers regarding the recycling movement is that it is completely sustainable. In reality, much of the western world’s “recycled” goods simply end up in landfills and dumping grounds in the developing world. Far from being actual recycling through the reuse of discarded materials, much of the “recycling” industry simply removes rubbish from western countries and puts them in foreign countries where the waste sits and rots, all the while blighting the local environment.

 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Olduvai IV: Courage
In progress...

Olduvai II: Exodus
Click on image to purchase