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‘Clean’ natural gas is actually the new coal, report says: Don Pittis

‘Clean’ natural gas is actually the new coal, report says: Don Pittis

Global investment of more than $1 trillion in planned LNG plants at risk

Employees work next to tanks for liquefied natural gas at a factory in Xian, China in June. China is a prime customer in a worldwide LNG expansion. (Reuters)

There’s no question that when you burn it, methane, the main component of natural gas, is much cleaner than coal.

With that in mind, you might think a newly released report titled The New Gas Boom should be cause for celebration.

Instead, the fresh analysis from Global Energy Monitor, a group well known in energy circles for keeping track of coal plant construction in Asia, sounds a warning, not just for the climate but for investors in what it calculates as a risky $1.3 trillion US worth of global gas infrastructure.

Effectively, the report warns that rather than being an environment-friendly product that can help solve our climate problems, gas is the new coal.

The explosion in spending on planned new liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities — the vast majority in the U.S. and Canada — combined with new calculations for leakage from the LNG supply chain called fugitive gas — means the world may soon turn against gas in the same way it turned against its solid fuel relative.

“New studies have shown there is significantly more fugitive gas than studies showed five years ago, and the gas is also a bigger contributor to climate change than was understood,” said James Browning, one of the report’s authors.

A 34,000-ton heavy lift vessel carries barges for LNG Canada completing pre-construction work at Kitimat, B.C., last fall to prepare the port for larger vessels once the new $40-billion natural gas export facility is constructed.(YouTube/LNG Canada)

 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Two Pipelines Shut Down After 43 Barrels of Crude Leak into Missouri Soil

Two Pipelines Shut Down After 43 Barrels of Crude Leak into Missouri Soil

Parts of two pipelines owned by controversial Canadian pipeline companies remained shut down Thursday following the discovery of a leak near St. Louis, Missouri on Wednesday, CBC News reported

Both TransCanada‘s Keystone pipeline and Enbridge‘s Platte pipeline run parallel to each other through the area. The Keystone pipeline, which carries 590,000 barrels of crude oil a day from Alberta, has faced opposition from environmental activists in the area because it transports from Alberta’s tar sands.

“[Leaks] are one more reason on top of climate change to show that tar sands are dangerous and should not be running through our state,” Missouri Sierra Club Director John Hickey told St. Louis Public Radio. Residents are also worried the poor quality of the pipeline’s steel makes leaks more likely, Hickey said.

The leak was discovered by a TransCanada technician 7:14 a.m. Wednesday. The technician found crude oil covering some 4,000 square feet around the pipeline in St. Charles County, Missouri. TransCanada said it was not sure how much oil had leaked, but thought it was around 43 barrels. The company said it was not yet possible to tell if the leak came from the Keystone or neighboring Enbridge pipeline.

“Until you can excavate and see the top of the pipes, you can’t really determine which pipeline the release occurred from,” TransCanada Public Information Officer Matthew John told St. Louis Public Radio.

 …click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Toronto gas stations running low on fuel thanks to nasty winter weather

Toronto gas stations running low on fuel thanks to nasty winter weather

Road conditions and extreme cold making it hard for trucks to deliver gas

Drivers in Toronto are having a hard time finding gas this week thanks to a stretch of heavy snow and bitterly cold temperatures. (The Associated Press)7 comments

After a week of snow, wind and bitter cold, Old Man Winter is now making life hard for Torontonians at the gas pumps.

Dozens of stations around the city have been out of fuel for days, leaving drivers confused and in the lurch.

Suppliers say the bad weather has made it hard to deliver fuel to the empty stations, though none have said when the stations will be up and running as usual.

“Poor weather conditions in the GTA has impacted our delivery schedule. We are working to replenish the sites as quickly as we can, while ensuring the safety of our people,” wrote Nicole Fisher, a spokesperson for Suncor Energy.

“This is an industry issue caused by poor road conditions and extreme cold,” said Kristen Schmidt of Shell Canada.

Dan McTeague, a senior petroleum analyst with GasBuddy, is advising drivers to avoid filling up unless they have to. He also thinks the crunch will be over soon.

“You’re likely to see by midpoint next week, this really won’t be much of an issue,” he told CBC Toronto.

“There’s no shortage at refineries, there’s no shortage at the terminal, the pipelines are working quite well. It’s the truck transportation and the logistics around that,” he added.

What slowdown? Vancouver and Toronto real estate markets still hot and unaffordable for many

What slowdown? Vancouver and Toronto real estate markets still hot and unaffordable for many

Housing prices are once again climbing in Vancouver and Toronto may soon follow

Emelia Symington Fedy with her partner, Christie Watson, and two children in Vancouver — the city the family is leaving because they can't afford to live there.

Emelia Symington Fedy with her partner, Christie Watson, and two children in Vancouver — the city the family is leaving because they can’t afford to live there. (Emelia Symington Fedy)

With recent price declines in Canada’s hot real estate markets, there’s been talk of a slowdown. But, so far, it’s hardly something for prospective buyers to get excited about.

While prices did drop after the introduction of a foreign homebuyers tax in Vancouver last year, they’re once again surging to new highs.

In Toronto, both prices and sales have taken a dive since the same type of tax came into effect in April.

Some had hoped a combination of recent government rule changes making it harder to get a mortgage, higher mortgage rates and the foreign buyers tax might have a lasting effect in cooling the market.

However, Toronto home prices are still up compared to last year and some industry experts predict that, as in Vancouver, the city’s recent dip will simply be a blip.

And as long as Toronto and Vancouver’s real estate markets continue to sizzle, many people will continue to find home ownership out of reach in these cities.

‘I just don’t get to live here,” says Emelia Symington Fedy, who’s moving her family from Vancouver to Halifax because she can’t afford the high cost of housing in her beloved city. “It feels like my lover has jilted me. I’m heartbroken.”

Vancouver downturn dashed

In August 2016, the B.C. government implemented a 15 per cent tax on foreign nationals buying property in Metro Vancouver to help cool skyrocketing house prices. For a time, the tax appeared to be working.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Foonie? As loonie turns 30, it’s time to think of a name for a $5 coin: Don Pittis

Foonie? As loonie turns 30, it’s time to think of a name for a $5 coin: Don Pittis

And while we’re at it, Canadians must lose their attachment to those pesky nickels

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield presents Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz with the $5 bill he took into space. Maybe next time, it will be a coin.

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield presents Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz with the $5 bill he took into space. Maybe next time, it will be a coin. (Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press)

Foonie doesn’t really work, so Canadians will have to put on their thinking caps to figure out a name for the $5 coin.

As the loonie turns 30 this week, painful though it may be, we must inevitably begin to prepare ourselves to say goodbye to our blue Wilfrids.

This is not an inside scoop from the Bank of Canada; officially there is no plan to kill the bill.

But there is evidence it is already on the minds of Canadians: The Royal Canadian Mint includes a query about a $5 coin in its list of frequently asked questions.

‘Cost-saving measure’

“The decision to issue a new circulation coin is the responsibility of the Canadian government,” says the mint’s answer to that FAQ. “There are currently no plans to make $5 coins or discontinue the $5 bill.”

However the final line of the FAQ could be taken as a hint: “The $2 coin was introduced as a cost-saving measure in 1996.”

In other words, it has been more that 20 years since the last time a bill was replaced by a money-saving coin.

You can see why the mint would want to soften us up in advance.

Canadian five from Bank of Canada website

Get ready to say goodbye to Wilfrid Laurier, Canada’s seventh prime minister, though the tough new polymer bills may give him more staying power than the paper ones and twos. (Bank of Canada)

As we witnessed during the long and divisive battle to be rid of a penny that had become absurdly valueless, families were divided for and against the copper-coloured coin. Evidently people have an odd attachment to their money.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Saudi Arabia top non-U.S. destination for Canadian arms exports: federal report

LAVs (light armoured vehicles) and components similar to the one pictured above are among the top military exports Canada sends to Saudi Arabia.

LAVs (light armoured vehicles) and components similar to the one pictured above are among the top military exports Canada sends to Saudi Arabia. (Bill Graveland/Canadian Press)

Saudi Arabia has regained its title as Canada’s top non-U.S. destination for exporting military goods after having been narrowly bumped last year by the United Kingdom, according to a federal report on arms sales.

The report, prepared by Global Affairs Canada and tabled in Parliament on Tuesday, reveals that the Saudi government purchased over $142 million worth of Canadian arms in 2016. That accounted for nearly 20 per cent of all Canadian munitions exports reported in the annual filing.

The report does not factor in arms exports to the United States, due to a long-standing exemption agreement. However, as stated in the report, as a general rule shipments to the U.S. account for nearly 50 per cent of all military good exports from Canada.

military exports indexed 2016

The total value of military goods sold abroad to countries other than the U.S. last year nearly reached $718 million. Canada’s NATO partners and traditional allies made up the bulk of the export market, including Australia, which purchased $115.8 million of Canadian-made equipment — second behind Saudi Arabia.

The sales to Saudi Arabia, however, will likely the draw the most attention and potential criticism from human rights groups, which have fought a protracted battle to halt the $14.8-billion sale of light armoured vehicles by General Dynamics Land Systems Canada — a deal approved by the former Conservative government, but green-lit by the Liberals.

The executive director for the anti-armament group Project Ploughshares says the most recent report once again signals an unwillingness on the part of the government to change its stance on Saudi Arabia.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

‘The worst scenario’: What if Canada’s real estate bubble bursts?

‘The worst scenario’: What if Canada’s real estate bubble bursts?

A repeat of Toronto’s 1989 crash could have devastating effects on the entire economy

Builders work on a new home in North Vancouver in 2016. The average home price in Canada climbed by 10 per cent to $559,317 in April, the Canadian Real Estate Association says.

Builders work on a new home in North Vancouver in 2016. The average home price in Canada climbed by 10 per cent to $559,317 in April, the Canadian Real Estate Association says. (Canadian Press)

It’s the question lingering behind every headline. It’s whispered among homeowners, would-be buyers and sellers, economists and policy-makers. What actually happens if Canadian real estate prices crash?

On the one hand, a crash might be good for some Canadians already priced out of the market. And even a dramatic 40 per cent drop in prices would set homeowners in markets like Toronto or Vancouver back, what, two or three years?

But there are broader concerns for the market and the economy itself that could prove devastating.

Home prices are notoriously off the charts. Everyone from the governor of the Bank of Canada to the chatty guy in your local cafe has said, repeatedly, that this increase in prices is not sustainable. But what that means, precisely, is vague.

The latest numbers from the Canadian Real Estate Association show the average home price in Canada climbed by 10 per cent to $559,317 in April. Notably, the number of sales in Toronto’s red-hot market fell by almost seven per cent but prices continued to rise.

No one is saying the end is nigh. Most are still banking on that ambiguous “soft landing” policy-makers have talked about for years. But, for the sake of argument and for a better understanding of the risks, let’s talk about what a real crash would look like.

CANADA-HOUSING/

A ‘Sold’ sign is stands at an empty lot in a new subdivision in Calgary in 2015. Canadian home prices are off the charts, and a lot of people say they are not sustainable. But what that means is vague. (Reuters)

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Wet weather walloping much of Ontario, Quebec and heading east

Wet weather walloping much of Ontario, Quebec and heading east

Ottawa River, Laurentian communities hit hard; New Brunswick expected to be next

Some Pointe-Gatineau, Que., residents have had to abandon their cars trapped by flooding. Firefighters have gone door-to-door in parts of Gatineau to warn residents of the dangers of staying put as forecasts call for rain throughout the weekend.

Some Pointe-Gatineau, Que., residents have had to abandon their cars trapped by flooding. Firefighters have gone door-to-door in parts of Gatineau to warn residents of the dangers of staying put as forecasts call for rain throughout the weekend. (CBC)Poster of video clipPoster of video clipHeavy rainfall affected airline passengers in Canada’s busiest airport on Friday, while voluntary evacuation orders were in effect in some areas of Ontario and Quebec.

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for much of Quebec and a rainfall warning for much of southern and eastern Ontario. New Brunswick, particularly the southern part of the province, will be in the crosshairs of the slow-moving system beginning Friday night and into Saturday.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in Montreal on Friday morning, said the federal government is closely monitoring the flood threat.

“Our thoughts are with the families, the communities affected by the severe flooding that’s going on throughout Quebec and indeed across the country,” he said.

He praised the volunteers and first responders helping out and said Ottawa was ready to respond to formal requests for assistance.

“We will, of course, be there as the cleanup continues after the waters recede,” he said.

In all affected areas, residents are being warned to stay away from banks of rivers and streams and low-lying areas and to avoid driving into standing water. Homeowners are advised to ensure valuables aren’t kept in basements, to make sure catch basins and eaves are clear of leaves and debris, and to call 311 to report any flooding issues.

Quebec

The most wide-ranging threats of flooding are in Quebec, with 124 communities in the province affected.

Urgences Québec says more than 1,326 residences in the province have been affected by flooding this week, with at least 700 people forced out of their homes.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Neither Le Pen nor Macron: Many French voters refuse to accept their options for president

Neither Le Pen nor Macron: Many French voters refuse to accept their options for president

Two remaining candidates fight for same political terrain as May 7 vote approaches

A man kicks back a tear gas canister at police in Paris on April 27, 2017 during a demonstration against the results of the first round of the presidential election.

A man kicks back a tear gas canister at police in Paris on April 27, 2017 during a demonstration against the results of the first round of the presidential election. (Lionel Bonaventure/Getty Images)

“Il est un gigolo.”

With that, the waitress dismissed France’s front-runner for president, Emmanuel Macron, as swiftly as she carried away the empty dishes.

Two weeks later, after the results of the first round of voting on April 23 pit centrist Macron head-to-head with far-right candidate Marine Le Pen, the waitress, who gave her name as Lucie, was forced to reconsider.

“It’s not much of a choice,” she said standing among the empty tables of the central Paris restaurant where she works. She wavered repeatedly between putting Macron ahead of Le Pen and not choosing at all.

The historic first round of voting redrew France’s political map and lines are necessarily shifting again. French citizens who may be following the old advice of voting with their hearts in the first round, then with their heads in the second, are now in the fraught process of a quick rethink before the May 7 vote that will determine their country’s next leader.

FRANCE-ELECTION/

Emmanuel Macron, left, and Marine Le Pen will go head-to-head in the second round of France’s presidential election on May 7. Many voters aren’t thrilled with their options. (Christian Hartmann/Reuters)

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‘Get lined up’: Alberta gas producer’s demise leaves long list of creditors and costly messes

Maureen and Wendell Strong have two former Lexin Resources natural gas wells on their land near Nanton, Alta. The province's energy regulator shut down the struggling company back in February.

Maureen and Wendell Strong have two former Lexin Resources natural gas wells on their land near Nanton, Alta. The province’s energy regulator shut down the struggling company back in February. (Tracy Johnson/CBC)

Maureen and Wendell Strong started hearing the rumours early in 2016: Alberta landowners with Lexin Resources natural gas wells on their property weren’t getting paid.

The Strongs, who had two Lexin wells on their land south of High River, and decades of experience dealing with the energy industry, waited anxiously to see if they’d receive their money.

In Alberta, most landowners don’t own the mineral rights below their land and are required to allow access to energy companies that want to drill wells. Landowners like the Strongs are paid an annual lease rate that typically totals a few thousand dollars.

“We were on the alert, watching,” Maureen said, “and when the time went past, that’s when we got the name of the guy at Lexin and phoned him. Nice guy but he said, ‘Just get lined up, we’ve had 700 calls on this.'”

In March, Lexin Resources was forced into bankruptcy by the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) — an order the company is fighting in court. Documents from the case show landowners like the Strongs have plenty of company on the list of creditors seeking payment from Lexin.

They range from a small scaffolding company to Baker Hughes, one of the largest oil services companies in the world. The Alberta government is also looking for unpaid royalties, rural municipalities are claiming unpaid taxes, and there are former workers who are looking for vacation pay and severance and are concerned about their pension plan.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Climate change causes glacial river in Yukon to change direction

Climate change causes glacial river in Yukon to change direction

Glacier retreated so much that its meltwater switched course, in an event not documented in modern times

Geoscientist Dan Shugar gazes out over exposed sediments and dust storms at Kluane Lake in the Yukon in the summer of 2016. Covered in water just months before, the delta top was left exposed and prone to wind erosion after meltwater from the Kaskawulsh Glacier changed direction due to climate change.

Geoscientist Dan Shugar gazes out over exposed sediments and dust storms at Kluane Lake in the Yukon in the summer of 2016. Covered in water just months before, the delta top was left exposed and prone to wind erosion after meltwater from the Kaskawulsh Glacier changed direction due to climate change. (Jim Best/University of Illinois)

Climate change has caused the massive Kaskawulsh Glacier in the Yukon to retreat so much that its meltwater abruptly switched direction, in the first documented case of “river piracy” in modern times.

Instead of flowing into the Slims River and then north to the Bering Sea, the water has changed course and now flows south toward the Kaskawulsh River, the Gulf of Alaska and the Pacific Ocean, scientists have found.

Also known as stream capture, river piracy is a term used to describe a geologic phenomenon where a stream or river is diverted toward another body of water. It’s usually caused by a dramatic tectonic event, such as a landslide or glacial dam collapse.

“This was the first event we could find where river piracy occurred right under our noses and due to contemporary climate change,” said Dan Shugar, a geoscientist at the University of Washington Tacoma and lead author of a study published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Kaskawulsh glacier map

Yukon’s Kaskawulsh glacier in Kluane National Park. (CBC)

Previous cases of river piracy may have taken place thousands of years ago or more, said Shugar in an interview with CBC News.

A river gone missing

The discovery of the change happened last summer, quite by accident for this team of scientists.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

CIBC CEO explains why bank is replacing Canadian staff with workers from India

CIBC CEO explains why bank is replacing Canadian staff with workers from India

CEO Victor Dodig acknowledges that ‘outsourcing isn’t a popular decision’

CIBC CEO Victor Dodig sent a memo to staff on Friday to explain why the bank sometimes needs to outsource work to other countries.

CIBC CEO Victor Dodig sent a memo to staff on Friday to explain why the bank sometimes needs to outsource work to other countries. (Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press)

CIBC’s CEO issued an internal staff memo Friday to address a CBC News story revealing that the bank is eliminating up to 130 Toronto finance jobs and outsourcing the work to India.

The article, which ran on Thursday, generated more than 2,000 comments on the CBC News site — many of them taking a negative view of CIBC’s decision to send the jobs overseas.

“I understand that outsourcing isn’t a popular decision,” wrote CEO Victor Dodig in the memo to employees. “It’s an emotional topic that I don’t want to shy away from because that’s not the culture that we have.”

The story only came to light because some CIBC workers facing layoffs complained to CBC News. They were particularly upset that they have to train other local CIBC employees who then train the workers in India who will be taking over the jobs.

“It feels like no one cares for us,” said one employee.

It’s not about the money

In his memo, Dodig laid out why the bank sometimes outsources jobs to other countries. Some affected employees said they believe CIBC is doing it in this case to save money — at a time when the bank had pulled in $1.4 billion in profit in the last quarter.

“It’s not as simple as you may read that it’s about cutting jobs or costs,” wrote Dodig. He said that outsourcing complements the work done by CIBC staff by helping manage peaks in demand, ensuring work can be done around the clock and helping the bank adapt to changing business needs.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Liberals to announce marijuana will be legal by July 1, 2018

Liberals to announce marijuana will be legal by July 1, 2018

Provinces will have right to decide how marijuana is distributed and sold, CBC News has learned

CBC News has learned that the federal government will announce the week of April 10 that new legislation will make the sale of marijuana legal by July 1, 2018.

CBC News has learned that the federal government will announce the week of April 10 that new legislation will make the sale of marijuana legal by July 1, 2018. (Mark Blinch/Canadian Press)

The Liberal government will announce legislation next month that will legalize marijuana in Canada by July 1, 2018.

CBC News has learned that the legislation will be announced during the week of April 10 and will broadly follow the recommendation of a federally appointed task force that was chaired by former liberal Justice Minister Anne McLellan.

Bill Blair, the former Toronto police chief who has been stickhandling the marijuana file for the government, briefed the Liberal caucus on the roll-out plan and the legislation during caucus meetings this weekend, according to a senior government official who spoke to CBC News on condition of anonymity.

Blair Marijuana 20160224

Bill Blair, parliamentary secretary to the minister of justice, briefed the Liberal caucus on new marijuana legislation, which leaves the provinces to decide how marijuana is distributed and sold, according to a senior government official. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

Provinces to control sales

The federal government will be in charge of making sure the country’s marijuana supply is safe and secure and Ottawa will license producers.

But the provinces will have the right to decide how the marijuana is distributed and sold. Provincial governments will also have the right to set price.

While Ottawa will set a minimum age of 18 to buy marijuana, the provinces will have the option of setting a higher age limit if they wish.

4 plants per household

As for Canadians who want to grow their own marijuana, they will be limited to four plants per household.

Legalizing marijuana was one of the more controversial promises Justin Trudeau made as he campaigned to become prime minister.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Newfoundland Power ends conservation warning; 13,500 still in the dark in N.L.

Newfoundland Power ends conservation warning; 13,500 still in the dark in N.L.

About 140 traffic lights in St. John’s need replacement, but city has only 30-40 spares

More than 70 intersections in St. John's were missing traffic lights Sunday afternoon due to Saturday's hurricane-force winds.

More than 70 intersections in St. John’s were missing traffic lights Sunday afternoon due to Saturday’s hurricane-force winds. (Mark Cumby/CBC)

Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro has ended its power warning, with a unit at its Holyrood generating station fully back online.

The power utility issued a request noon Sunday, asking customers on the Avalon Peninsula to conserve energy as it slowly brought Unit 1 back on line. Demand had been approaching the system’s full capacity, but around 6:15 p.m. Hydro announced the unit was back in service and ended the warning.

There are still 13,500 customers without power, after a storm with powerful winds knocked out power lines, ripped siding and roofs off homes and overturned a truck.

Among the customers without power is St. John’s airport, which is operating on backup power. Desk agents at the airport are wearing parkas because of the lack of heat and baggage carousels are out of service.

Airport on backup power

The St. John’s airport is without heat and full electricity and is operating on backup power. (Peter Cowan/CBC)

Some traffic lights throughout the St. John’s area are flashing, or missing completely.

St. John’s Coun. Danny Breen said Sunday there are 72 intersections in St. John’s with traffic lights that are either not working or down completely. While some damaged lights can be repaired, the city will have to replace about 140 lights, but only has 30 to 40 spares on hand.


Public Advisory: @GovNL@CityofStJohns & @Mount_Pearl have delayed openings for govt offices in metro tomorrow: http://bit.ly/2mg7or1 

Oil prices set to rise sharply, unless new projects are approved

Oil prices set to rise sharply, unless new projects are approved

Without new investments, oil prices will rise sharply in the next five years, energy conference told

The International Energy Agency says there will be supply problems in three years if a two-year trend in falling oil investments continues into 2017.

The International Energy Agency says there will be supply problems in three years if a two-year trend in falling oil investments continues into 2017. (Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press)

Oil prices are set to rise sharply starting in 2020 if new energy investments are not made this year.

That was the message of the International Energy Agency as the CERAWeek energy conference kicked off in Houston. There’s a worldwide glut of oil now, and the IEA said that supply looks adequate for the next three years, thanks to rising production from U.S. shale producers and Canadian oilsands projects that were sanctioned before the oil price crunch began.

However, oil investments dropped sharply in both 2015 and 2016, and if that trend continues into 2017, there will be a problem in three years.

“We have seen two years in a row of huge declines in upstream investment. If this is the case in 2017, if we don’t see substantial rebound, we may well see that the market tightens around 2020 and the spare production capacity shrinks,” said Fatih Birol, the chairman of the IEA, at a news conference in Houston.

Oil investment globally was $450 billion US in 2016. The IEA is hoping to see that increase by 20 per cent, a further $90 billion US in 2017. In 2016, oil investment in Canada was estimated at $37 billion, and the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers expects it to rise to $44 billion in 2017.

IHS CERAWeek 2016

Fatih Birol, executive director of the International Energy Agency, speaks about the state of the oil industry at the annual IHS CERAWeek global energy conference Monday in Houston. (Pat Sullivan/Associated Press)

Birol made reference to 2008, when prices spiked to more than $140 US per barrel, saying that without new investment, the oil market could be tighter in 2022 than it was in 2008.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Olduvai IV: Courage
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Olduvai II: Exodus
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