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Four Reasons Why You Should Stash the Cash!

With inflation and gas and food shortages on the rise, it is an excellent idea to have some cash stashed for emergencies. I know we live in a world that believes that there is an ATM around the corner and keeping cash in your wallet or in your home is obsolete, but there are some events that will prove it is good to have some loose cash around.

1. Stolen Credit and Debit Cards

A few years ago, I used to run at a local park after I got off work. My workout sessions were only 35 minutes to an hour, so I was never particularly worried that my car would be broken into. However, one Friday when I returned to my vehicle, my windows were busted out, and my bag, which was hidden, was missing. I should have known better than to leave a bag in the car, but I never thought it could happen to me. (How many times have we heard that phrase and shook our heads?) There is nothing worse than having your wallet stolen and having to contact the credit card companies and the banks to tell them. Immediately, all purchasing power is put on stop. In my case, it was on a Friday, and I couldn’t get my debit card reissued until the following Monday. At that time, I did not have a stash of cash, and I had to borrow money from my family. This one event is what led me to having a stash of cash.

2. Limits on Large Purchases

Many families are experiencing financial difficulties because of Covid, and since people have been unable to pay their card debt, the banks have reduced the limits that they offer…

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

How to build family bug out bags – 2021

How to build family bug out bags – 2021

If an event forced you and your family out of your home in a matter of minutes, would you have prepared enough in advance to have the right items to ensure you, your family, and your pets would be okay if you were restricted to the disaster zone and help was days away?

If I told you that you and your family had to leave your home in five minutes from right now and survive with no help for seventy-two hours, could you do it?  In this article, I’ll walk you through the critical items you’d want to have ready to ensure your and your family’s safety.

It is a bit challenging doing articles on these bags as everyone has different needs and you’ll face different challenges based on where you live.  Also, these bags are part of a bigger evacuation system I’ve built I’ll detail in a future video, but the primary goal of these bags is simply to keep you alive for 72 hours if you had to evacuate your home quickly.

Below are the items based on the category you need to consider.  Also, here’s a quick link to each section:

Adults

Backpack

When it comes to backpacks, the options are seemingly endless.  I have personally swapped out my backpack for the Vanquest IBEX 35 and for my wife, I set her up with the smaller Vanquest IBEX 26.  The goal is to keep the weight under 15% of your body weight and no more than 20%.

Shelter

Water

Light

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Natural medicines to use after SHTF

Image: Natural medicines to use after SHTF

(Natural News) If ever SHTF, you might not be able to have access to medication that can treat all sorts of ailments and injuries in a survival scenario. Before that even happens, you should start preparing for that scenario by stockpiling and growing your own supply of natural medicines. Here are a few natural remedies that can be incredibly useful after SHTF. (h/t to SurvivalSullivan.com.)

Amaranth

Packed with essential vitamins and nutrients, this healing herb is a common ingredient in natural painkillers. It possesses anti-inflammatory properties and contains a peptide that can help alleviate pain associated with gout and arthritis. It may even help protect you from damage from free radicals. Amaranth is also incredibly useful to diabetics due to its ability to help manage blood sugar levels and reduce insulin levels. Other health benefits of amaranth include boosting your immune system, stimulating bone and muscle repair, and strengthening your bones.

Yarrow

Yarrow is a perennial herb that is useful for the treatment of wounds, cuts, and abrasions. It is also known by its common names of staunchweed and soldier’s woundwort. These names are fitting as you can always count on this reliable herb to staunch wounds that will not stop bleeding. You can crush the plant’s leaves and apply them topically on your open wounds to encourage clotting and lessen the likelihood of infection. The traditional use of this antiseptic herb involves drying it, powdering it, then mixing it with either plantain or comfrey water. It can also be freshly used as a poultice. (Related: 23 Medicinal plants you need to know about when SHTF.)

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

The 10 Daily Habits of Prepared People

The 10 Daily Habits of Prepared People

For some people, preparedness is about the big things: the well-stocked retreat home, buying yet another firearm, or getting a super-fancy generator. While these things can certainly be classified as preparedness endeavors, it isn’t the expensive and dramatic gestures that make us truly prepared people.

The way prepared people spend their time before an emergency is the real key to survival, and this is something that no amount of money can buy.

It’s the small daily habits that become an innate part of our everyday lives – habits that may not even be noticeable to someone outside the lifestyle.

Real preppers, the ones you should look to for advice if you happen to be new to preparedness, are the ones who quietly conduct their daily lives with an eye towards readiness. Not only are these the qualities you should strive for yourself, but they are also the qualities that can help you to determine whether someone is the “real deal” or an armchair survivalist.

#1: Prepared people think beyond “Plan A”

Anytime one disaster occurs, several others are bound to follow closely in their wake. One of the most dramatic examples of this was the tsunami that followed closely on the heels of the 2011 earthquake in Japan, resulting in one of the most horrific nuclear disasters in the history of the world.

But it doesn’t have to be on such an epic scale to qualify. No matter how excellent your survival plan is, if things go awry you must immediately be able to accept that monkey wrench and adapt your plan to it.

Prepared people understand that even the most perfect plans can go wrong, and they are willing to abandon it and act on the fluid situation at hand.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Have You Considered Spare Parts for Your Preps?

Have You Considered Spare Parts for Your Preps?

One of the most overlooked parts of most people’s preparations is spare parts for the equipment they plan to use in an emergency or a crisis. We all like to think we are covered when we have the actual items in our possession, but what if they break? What if the power source runs out? When you know you could have fixed the problem with a simple spare part, you will get pretty frustrated pretty fast.

What spare parts should you have on hand? That depends on your equipment and what you plan to use it for. Your list could look different from mine because we might have different items. The items mentioned in this post are general items. Most of these things are basic items and would be able to fix or repair your broken-down item. I am also thinking about needing to recharge or refuel items because your generator or camp stove will be worthless if you run out of fuel.
Batteries are always a must. While having hand-cranked flashlights and radios are great, most emergency equipment works better and faster with batteries. I would keep a lot of batteries in sorts of sizes. Most battery powered objects take either AA, AAA, C, D, and 9-volt batteries. I keep mine in a storage container similar to this. You could keep multiples of these storage containers in the house, garage, shop, and wherever you may need to use them. If you need specialty batteries, I would make a list of those and pick those batteries up the next time shopping. For specialty batteries, I would keep them near the object that takes them so you aren’t hunting them down in an emergency.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

5 Things You Never Thought You Needed In Your Prepper Gear

5 Things You Never Thought You Needed In Your Prepper Gear

Preparing for the worst is often looked down upon by those who don’t think there’s any reason to prepare for even a natural disaster by storing a bit of extra food.  But when you live in an area where even major blizzards are possible in winter, thoughts often go to the most obscure items and their potential use.  Here, we will list five things you may or may not have thought to add to prepping supply or gear and some possible uses.

While food, water, and ammunition seem like the obvious items to hoard and store safely for a SHTF scenario, these five items could also help, even though it may not have been considered before now.  But once you see the things we’ve come up with, we are confident you could think of even more ways to use these valuable items!

1.A PENCIL SHARPENER

A pencil sharpener is small and light, but that’s only one reason to toss it in your bug out bag or put it in your bunker or food storage room.  You could even save a few pencils if you so desire.  But a pencil sharpener could be an invaluable tool to help you make kindling.  You would simply use the pencil sharpener to sharpen a pencil (or a twig) and get kindling to help you start a fire. Most preppers carry a lighter but stop short at thinking they could need kindling to help get a fire going. Obviously, you can shave down wood into tinder using a great knife (if you have one handy) or you might be able to find some small twigs, but nothing you can carry can make kindling quite as easily and more safely as a pencil sharpener.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

How to Find Essential Resources in Your Area (Before You Ever Need to Scavenge)

How to Find Essential Resources in Your Area (Before You Ever Need to Scavenge)

What if things really went crazy and you were in a situation in which you needed to scavenge? Would you know where to find the things you might need, like food, drugs, or water? This useful article will help you find and record the essential resources in your area – while the information is still easy to obtain. ~ Editor

You need to know where essential resources in your area are located. During a disaster you never know what you might need, so grab every bit of free information about where you live that might conceivably be useful after the SHTF while you still can.

GPS mapping may or may not be available to you during an emergency so we recommend that you obtain the following addresses on paper, but also in computer files. The maps presented in Part 3 will be very useful in navigating your way to these locations should your GPS not be working.

You should also compile the following lists into computer files and print them out. I recommend you use duckduckgo.com for Internet searching because they don’t track or save your searches. Given that the local telephone book no longer exists you can try yellowpages.com/ for many of these.

Put all the lists in one or more 3 ring binders with tabs as appropriate. Store all the lists and the maps in one place. Also, store these maps and lists on USB flash drives or miniSD cards as appropriate to your needs. See Part 2 of this series for computer storage suggestions. If your phone will allow you to do so, you should also store selected files on your smartphone along with the appropriate app to read them.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

It’s Not Doom and Gloom: Preparedness is the Ultimate Act of Optimism

It’s Not Doom and Gloom: Preparedness is the Ultimate Act of Optimism

Does this sound familiar?

You’re talking to a friend or family member who isn’t on board with preparedness.  (And it’s even worse when they think they know what’s going on in the world but garner their so-called “information” from network news sources.)  You try for the millionth time to get them to consider stocking up on a few things and they say this:

Life’s too short for all of this doom and gloom.  Live a little! You’re such a pessimist!

My response to this is that preparedness is the ultimate form of optimism.

One who practices skills, makes dramatic lifestyle changes, and studies current events critically may come across to the uninitiated as a person who has buried himself or herself in negativity, but in fact, one who prepares is saying to life, “Whatever comes, we are not only going to live through it, my family is going to thrive!”

I think that methods of preparedness can be compared to love songs on the radio.  Bear with me through this analogy.

If the songs that make you think of your significant other are sad, with reference to breaking up and getting back together, unsatisfied yearnings, arguments, frustration, anger, and broken hearts, you just might be doing the whole “love” thing wrong.  Shouldn’t the song that makes you think of the one you love be happy, upbeat, full of joy? Shouldn’t thoughts of that special someone make you more prone to goofy smiles and a warm glow than to melancholy longing or the urge to gleefully burn all of their belongings in a great pile in the front yard?

It’s exactly the same with preparedness.  Thoughts of your plans, your lifestyle, and your loaded pantry room should give you a sense of peace and security.  If your state of preparedness makes you feel unhappy, stressed, angry, or resentful, you’re doing something wrong.

Here are some examples of how prepping is pure, unadulterated optimism.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

How & Where Can Preppers Store All That Information?

How & Where Can Preppers Store All That Information?

Information Collection for the Prepper – Part 2

Most of the information discussed in these articles will be electronic files – specifically PDF and TIF files. This article will discuss how to safely store these files and use them before and after the SHTF.

Portable Storage of the Library

What I need to be able to do is read PDF and view TIF (graphic) files using my cell phone. It would be best if I could read these files from a USB drive, or secondarily, from a miniSD card. The plan would be that I would copy these files from my computer to these storage (USB and/or microSD) devices. I will sometimes call the information stored on these devices as the “Library”.

I like the Corsair Flash Survivor Stealth USB 3.0 Flash Drives because the USB drive is built into an “armored” case. The case appears to me to be made out of steel and rubber and is shock resistant with a water seal. These devices are about 3 inches long and about 1 inch in diameter. I have carried 2 of these devices in my pocket, along with my EDC (every day carry) stuff, for over a year now. My grandson carried the one I gave him on his keychain. The paint is a little worn but the devices still work fine. I have two 256 GB drives.

Here are the things that didn’t work:

I can carry thousands of PDF and other computer files with me everywhere I go. I just needed a portable device to read them with. Read on and I will tell you about my struggles finding a portable device to read these drives with.

  • My current cell phone is an Apple 4S. It has no capability to store computer files, nor any way to read files even if it did. I searched diligently for a cable with a female USB connector, into which I could plug my above-described USB drives, and that would plug into the connector on my phone. I never found one. Given that I never found a cable that even if I made up such a cable myself, which I didn’t, there would be no software with which to read the files.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

Winter Survival: Practical Preps for an Emergency Bug Out 

Winter Survival: Practical Preps for an Emergency Bug Out 

            

“I got to, got to, got to, get away…turn me loose, baby.” –  Jimi Hendrix, “Stone Free”

Yes, ReadyNutrition guys and gals, there comes a time when you just “got to get away,” so to speak.  This doesn’t mean to the sands of (what used to be) St. Bart’s.  This means “E&E,” or “Escape and Evasion,” as we used to call it in the Army.  But what if your car is not working because of an EMP…and you have two feet of snow on the ground?  What if you have a sheet of ice so thick on the ground that the Olympic Hockey Team could practice on it?  The “suck” factor will be high, and the adrenaline will be pumping.  You have to get out of there.  Are you prepared?

You can be.  Firstly, let’s refresh a few things that have been mentioned already.  You have your BOB (your happy “Bug-Out Bag”) if you wish to call it that.  It should be packed and ready in your vehicle.

And at this stage of the game, you should have already switched off for your winter needs, as we covered in numerous articles before.

You need both a Gore-Tex top and bottom for extreme cold weather.  First things first!  What are you facing?  If it’s the ice, you need a pair of Yak-Trak’s or Crepons (like these) to place upon your feet with metal spikes on the bottom to give you some traction.  Yes, these guys will run you about 30 to 40 bucks, and it’s well worth it.  The rubber harness that holds either springs or spikes/metal cleats are durable and will last you for more than a couple seasons if you use them regularly.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

The Self-Reliance Weekly Report – Feb. 3, 2016

The Self-Reliance Weekly Report – Feb. 3, 2016

Prepping

What to wear outside, winter edition.  When the snow is flying and the weather is cold, it’s vital to protect yourself from the potential of hypothermia. Layering is an essential part of keeping warm, and there are 4 specific layers you should have on. Not only should you dress in layers, but you should always have extra layers in your vehicle in the event of an emergency. (Here’s a peek at my winter vehicle emergency kit.) Who can forget the family of 6 in Nevada who survived for days in the frigid wilderness with only what they had in their vehicle? Accidents can happen to any of us, and inclement winter weather only makes them more likely. This guide from the US Marine Corp is a thorough overview of winter survival skills. The following articles will also help. You must make sure you know the priorities of winter survival and you’ll also want to check out this list of winter survival skills from a former Alaskan trapper, too.

Do you know what to do if you are lost in the wilderness? Speaking of outdoor survival skills, what would you do if you were lost in the wilderness?  Do your kids know what to do if they get lost out in the forest?  Check out these tips from a search-and-rescue class. Because it can be difficult to know everything, I also keep a little guide in all of the family backpacks, in my glove box, and in my everyday carry kit in my purse.

Use Alaska as a cautionary tale of what happens when the transportation system fails.  Obviously, Alaska isn’t producing a lot of food this time of year.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Learn To Fix It – Tips For Keeping Things Running Now And After The Collapse

Learn To Fix It – Tips For Keeping Things Running Now And After The Collapse

Being able to repair things is a useful skill to have – believe me, when you’ve knocked your iron off the ironing board repeatedly, it’s awful handy to know how to fix it. Tackling simple mechanical objects like an iron or (my recently fixed) Foodsaver vacuum machine can be intimidating, but with certain exceptions, you can do it.

First off, find out everything you can about your non-functioning device. Find the manual (you did keep the manual, yes? Got it at a garage sale? Time to Google!), check the manufacturer’s website, check sites that have manuals for sale if absolutely necessary. You might find that instructions for your device aren’t readily available. Fear not; much of what is inside an appliance is just air, and there is no magic dust, just mechanical and electrical/electronic parts.

The safety nag: never, never work on anything while it’s plugged in if the cover is off or there is the possibility of getting shocked. Electricity is your friend, but it also has a nasty sense of humor and loves to zap you. Keep water out of electrical devices when you clean as well. In a pinch, if you have to, a barely damp Q-tip, moistened with rubbing alcohol helps dig out crud and gunk.

Never force things to fit; having to press hard or use a screwdriver to move a latch to get something to fit isn’t forcing, trying to get things to go where they don’t fit or belong with the potential to break is. Take care if you are using any tools that have sharp edges; you can cut yourself with a screwdriver, so work away from yourself, not toward your body. You do not want to be driving your husband through a 25 MPH residential district at 40 MPH, panicked and looking for someplace to get his punctured hand fixed, like I did once.

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Family survival: 5 tips for distributing gear

Family survival: 5 tips for distributing gear

Family survival: 5 tips on distributing gearEver since I posted my article on my personal bug out bag, I’ve gotten quite a few questions on how to pack gear and what people should choose but one of the most common is how to share gear with your partner/kids/wife etc so I figured I’d write something up.

Sorry that I haven’t written in quite a while but I’m knee-deep in planning/writing a novel. It’ll be about a year or two before it’s finished but I think a lot of you will like it. It’s kind of part Brave New World, part Jericho, and a whole lot of awesome. Also, I’ve been knee-deep in organizing my motorcycle for some extended camping trips and travel where I can do some reviews on some of the gear I’ve picked up lately, including a vintage 1960’s Hudson Bay 4-point wool blanket and several other things.

Let’s assume you’re married and have a kid so there are three of you, each with varying skills and abilities. Here are the key points:

1) Have redundant survival capabilities

Just as with the critical things in your individual survival/bug out bag, you need to make sure you have redundant capabilities (not necessarily redundant gear). I go into some detail on this in The ‘Two is one and one is none’ fallacy so you may want to read that one too. Essentially, each bag should be able to allow you to cover all your survival bases but not all gear works in every scenario, so having different ways to do the same thing just may come in handy.

For example, you may be carrying a Trangia alcohol stove in one pack. They’re super portable and pretty capable little stoves (I have one), but they require alcohol (the best I’ve found is Yellow Heet but Everclear can be used in inclosed spaces and for wounds etc – check out this post for more fuel ideas).

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

3 Types of Emergencies That Could Happen to Anyone

3 Types of Emergencies That Could Happen to Anyone

Maybe you’re brand new to prepping and not sure where to start. Maybe you aren’t really interested in emergency preparedness but your well-meaning in-laws keep sending you links to websites about the topic.  Maybe you go to those websites and you see so much doom and gloom that you immediately exit. Maybe you say to yourself, “Holy cow, no!  I’m not one of those crazy Doomsday Preppers!”  (Maybe you’re the in-law sending the articles!)

If any of the above apply, then this post is for you.  It’s chock-full of links, supplies, resources, and information for those who are new to preparedness that may not be ready to dive in 100% just yet.

Prepping for Beginners (and Non-Preppers Who Like to be Sensible)

It’s all about what I like to call “prepping-lite”.  It’s for people who aren’t into apocalypse scenarios but who are sensible enough to realize that, well, stuff happens. Remember, prepping doesn’t mean you’re a doom-and-gloomer. It’s actually the ultimate act of optimism!

There are three types of emergencies that can strike nearly anyone.  These don’t require that you systematically pick apart every episode of The Walking Dead so you can figure out how to survive the impending zombie pandemic. They simply require that you flip on the news every now and then and see that these are everyday situations that can happen to us all.  And since you are wise enough to accept that these things are realistically things that could, at some point, affect you, I hope you’ll take that wisdom one step further and prepare for them.

 

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Olduvai IV: Courage
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Olduvai II: Exodus
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