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Futures Soar On Hope Central Planners Are Back In Control, China Rollercoaster Ends In The Red

Futures Soar On Hope Central Planners Are Back In Control, China Rollercoaster Ends In The Red

For the first half an hour after China opened, things looked bleak: after opening down 5%, the Shanghai Composite staged a quick relief rally, then tumbled again. And then, just around 10pm Eastern, we saw acoordinated central bank intervention stepping in to give the flailing PBOC a helping hand, driven by the BOJ but also involving NY Fed members, that sent the USDJPY soaring which in turn dragged ES and most risk assets up with it. And while Shanghai did end up closing down -1.7%, with Shenzhen 2.2% lower at the close, the final outcome was far better than what could have been, with the result being that S&P futures have gone back to doing their thing, and have wiped out all of yesterday’s losses in the levitating, zero volume, overnight session which has long become a favorite setting for central banks buying E-Minis.

As Bloomberg’s Richard Breslow comments, the majority of Asian equity indexes finished with losses but on an upbeat note, helping most European markets to start with modest gains that have increased with the morning, thanks to the aforementioned domestic and global mood stabilization. S&P futures have been positive all day other than a brief dip negative at the worst of the day’s China levels. Chinese equities opened quite weak and were down another 5% before the authorities assured the market that speculation they would withdraw from market supportive measures was misguided. This began a rally of over 6% before a mid-afternoon swoon.

 

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

Deflation Is Winning – Beware!

Deflation Is Winning – Beware!

Expect the ride to get even rougher

Deflation is back on the front burner and it’s going to destroy all of the careful central planning and related market manipulation of the past 6 years.

Clear signs from the periphery indicate that a destructive deflationary pulse has been unleashed. Tanking commodity prices are confirming that idea.

Whole groups of enterprises involved in mining and energy are about to be destroyed. And the commodity-heavy nations of Canada, Australia and Brazil are in for a very rough ride.

Whether the central banks can keep all of their carefully-propped equity and bond markets elevated throughout the next part of the cycle remains to be seen.  We know they will try very hard. They certainly are increasingly willing to use any all tools at their disposal to keep the status quo going for as long as possible.

Whether it’s the People’s Bank of China stepping in to the market to buy 10% stakes in major Chinese corporations in a matter of weeks, the Bank Of Japan becoming the majority owner of key ETFs in the Japanese markets, or the Swiss National Bank purchasing $100 billion of various global equities, we see the same desperation. Equity prices are being propped, jammed and extended higher and higher without regard to risk or repurcussions.

It makes us wonder: Why haven’t humans ever thought to print their way to prosperity before?

Well, that’s the problem. They have.

And it has always ended up disastrously.  History shows that the closest thing that economics has to an inviolable law is: There’s no such thing as a free lunch.

Sadly, all of our decision-makers are trying their hardest to ignore that truth.

First, The Fall….

So how will all of this progress from here?

We’ve always liked the Ka-Poom! theory by Erik Janzen which we explained previously like this:

 

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

China Soars Most Since 2009 After Government Threatens Short Sellers With Arrest, Global Stocks Surge

China Soars Most Since 2009 After Government Threatens Short Sellers With Arrest, Global Stocks Surge

Here is a brief sample of some of the measures the Chinese government and the PBOC have unleashed in just the past ten days to prop up the crashing market include:

  • a ban on major shareholders, corporate executives, directors from selling stock for 6 months
  • freezing more than half (1400 at last count per Bloomberg) of the listed companies from trading,
  • blocking fund redemptions, forcing companies to invest in the market,
  • halting IPOs,
  • reducing equity transaction fees,
  • providing daily bailouts to the margin lending authority,
  • reducing margin requirements,
  • boosting buybacks
  • endless propaganda by Beijing Bob.

The measures are summarized below.

But it wasn’t until last night’s first official threat to “malicious” (short) sellers that they face charges (i.e., arrest), as Xinhua reported yesterday:

[Ministry of Public Security in conjunction with the recent Commission investigation of malicious short stock and stock index clues ] correspondent was informed on the 9th morning , Vice Minister of Public Security Meng Qingfeng led to the Commission , in conjunction with the recent Commission investigation of malicious short stock and stock index clues show regulatory authorities to the operation of heavy combat illegal activities.

 

… that the wall of Chinese intervention finally worked. For now.

And since this is all about one thing, the stock, market, it is worth noting that the Shanghai Composite Index had dropped as much as 3.8% to a 4 month low before the news that the cops were going to arrest anyone who used a wrong discount rate in their DCF, when everything suddenly took off, and the SHCOMP closed  a “Dramamine required” 5.8% higher, the biggest daily increase since March 2009!

“As China beefs up its efforts to rescue the market, with even the public security ministry involved, market sentiment is recovering slightly from a panicky stage earlier,” Shenyin Wanguo analyst Qian Qimin says by phone

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

Will Greek “Hope” Offset “Limit Down” Contagion From The “Frozen” China Crash

Will Greek “Hope” Offset “Limit Down” Contagion From The “Frozen” China Crash

Today’s market battle will be between those (central banks) “hoping” that a Greek deal over the weekend is finallyimminent (which on one hand looks possible after a major backpeddling by Tsipras – who may never have wanted to win the Greferendum in the first place – yesterday in Brussels and today during his speech in the Euro Parliament, but on the other will be a nearly impossible sell to Greece as any deal terms will be far harsher than the deal offered by the Troika 2 weeks ago and will have no debt reduction), and those who finally noticed that the Chinese central planners have effectively lost control.

For those who may have missed the overnight fireworks, here are some more indicative Bloomberg headlines about China:

  • China’s Stocks Plunge as State Intervention Fails to Stop Rout
  • China Freezes Trading in 1,300 Companies as Stock Market Tumbles
  • China’s State-Owned Firms Ordered Not to Cut Share Holdings
  • China’s Market Rescue Makes Matters Worse as Prices Lose Meaning
  • China Ramps Up Policy Response as Panic Grips Stock Market

While pundits have been eager to downplay what is now a historic rout in Chinese risk assets, one that is matched by the depression of 2008 and which has sent the SHCOMP from up 60% for the year 3 weeks ago to barely green losing some 15 Greeces in market cap since mid-June

… the same pundits to whom neither the oil crash nor a Grexit nor the imminent collapse in Q2 corporate revenues and GAAP EPS, or anything else matters, the reality is that the Chinese stock rout is very clearly starting to have contagion effects on the rest of the economy, crashing commodities such as crude, gold, copper, iron and virtually everything else where China has been a marginal source of demand, but leading to forced selling of anything that is not nailed down.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

Controlling copper and silver prices

Controlling copper and silver prices

There is an unwarranted assumption that market prices are always right, and represent “fair value”. In the case of commodities, particularly metals, this is not necessarily true, because regulated financial markets make it too easy for government agencies and large banks to game the system.

Take the case of a country like China, which is the largest consumer of copper. Does it passively buy its copper through the market? No. Instead it strikes a price with a supplier, such as a Zambian copper mine, based on the London market price, bypassing the market entirely. If China plays no part in setting the reference price in London, the Zambians can be satisfied the price is fair; but if China or her agents suppressed the price of copper in the market before the price is set, the Zambians would be right to be upset.

Now, we do not know if China or her agents drive the copper price down, by placing a relatively small paper order so that the large off-market physical deal is priced favourably, but it is obviously in her interest to do so. Another metal where this could apply is silver.

We need to bear in mind three things about China and silver. She is the world’s largest industrial user, she is almost certainly the world’s largest refiner, and the government owns all the refineries. China imports large quantities of doré 1 and also base metal ores containing silver. So how she goes about this business is highly relevant to the silver price, and the following is an example of how it works.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

 

Commodities crash: Bad news for the world economy, but is anyone listening?

Commodities crash: Bad news for the world economy, but is anyone listening?

Reading the general run of financial headlines might lead one to believe that price declines in those commodities which are highly sensitive to economic conditions such as iron orecopperoilnatural gascoal, and lumber are good on their face.

Obviously, the declines aren’t good for those who sell these commodities. But, those of us who buy these commodities in the form of cars, houses, utility bills and other products and services ought to be helping the world economy as we buy more stuff with the freed up income.

As true as that may be, these commodity price declines also signal something else: exceptional weakness in the world economy. It is no secret that economic growth in Europe has been stalled for some time and is now receding. The European Union’s confrontation with Russia over the Ukraine conflict and the resulting tit-for-tat economic sanctions levied by both sides are only worsening the economic climate.

Russia has been hit by the double whammy of oil price declines and sanctions which are probably sending the country into recession. And, now the new anti-austerity government in Greece seems to be pushing Europe headlong into another Euro crisis as worries about Greek debt default spread.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

World Bank forecast causes markets to tumble

World Bank forecast causes markets to tumble

Copper prices – seen as measure of global economy – fall along with shares, after growth prediction cut to 3%

Copper prices fell and shares plummeted across Europe as markets reacted to the World Bank’s decision to cut its economic forecasts for this year and next.

The price of copper, regarded as a barometer of global economic demand, fell as much as 8% to a low not seen for more than five years after the World Bank said the world economy was too reliant on the US.

The bank blamed reduced prospects for growth in the eurozone, the state of finances in Japan and some big emerging economies for its decision to cut its 2015 global growth forecast to 3% from 3.4%.

Germany’s Dax index fell 0.75%, dragged down by steel producer ThyssenKrupp, which fell 3.6%. In France the CAC index dropped 0.9% as rival steel company ArcelorMittal lost 4.5%.

In London, copper miner Antofagasta fell more than 10% and was the biggest loser in the FTSE 100 index, which was down 1.3%. All the 10 worst performers in the index, including Glencore and oil producer BG Group, were commodities companies. Brent crude fell 1.7% to $45.78 a barrel.

“Europe has been pretty sluggish, China’s still got that property overhang, Japan’s entered recession. You’ve got the US and UK going fine, so it’s a patchy global growth picture – but it’s one that has definitely deteriorated from six months ago,” UBS analyst Daniel Morgan said.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

Either Crude or Copper

Either Crude or Copper

The primacy of the monetary pyramid in 2015 is not really about money as it is all ideology. If you believe that monetary policy provides “stimulus” then you immediately remove all thoughts of any economic decline during times when monetarism is most active. Since “it works” then all else must fall into place. Contrary indications are thus given extraordinary lengths to maintain logical consistency.

Economic commentary as it exists is incredibly short-sighted, though there is no reason to believe that is anything other than exactly what I stated above. The state of economics even as a discipline has internalized Keynes so deeply that all that matters is what happens month-to-month. That makes it easier to maintain the status quo of opinion about “stimulus” – in the short run it is very easy to find a suggestion for something behaving “unexpectedly.”

That was certainly the case with crude oil prices these past few months, as the initial impulse was uniformly and incessantly prodded to over-supply. Again, the reasoning behind that was simply since “stimulus” works and it was being practiced and replicated all over the world there was no possible means by which “demand” might drop, and so precipitously. After a few weeks of oil “unexpectedly” falling further, re-assurances were more difficult and increasingly derivative by nature.

…click on the above link to read the rest of the article…

 

Olduvai IV: Courage
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Olduvai II: Exodus
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