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Will we Ever be Able to End Wars? How the Wise are Confused

Will we Ever be Able to End Wars? How the Wise are Confused

One hundred years after the end of the war that was to end all wars, the First World War, we still don’t understand what wars are, why we fight wars, why we can’t stop fighting them. We are surrounded, it seems, by things we don’t understand: why do people fight wars? Why are wars so commmon? Why can’t we find a way to stop them? Why people still fall for the most obvious propaganda tricks?
Below, you can find an excerpt from the 1980 book by David Wilkinson, “Deadly Quarrels” that starts with a list of the various theories put forward in modern times to explain how peace could be attained. Still perfectly valid today, the list highlights the confusion pervading the attempts to put an end to war. It reminds the 200+ theories that Demandt reports for the reasons of the fall of the Roman Empire. More than that, it reminds of Paul of Tarsus (Corinthians 1) when he says “God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise.” And this is war, a foolish thing that keep confounding us.

From “Deadly Quarrels” by David Wilkinson, 1980 (*)

The most common way of contributing to the debate over war causation and peace strategy has been to assert some definite theory, to show how it fits current circumstances, and to deduce immediate practical conclusions. If we follow this public debate, we may expect to be told that war is a consequence, for instance, of wickedness, lawlessness, alienation, aggressive regimes, imperialism, poverty, militarism, anarchy, or weakness. Seldom will any evidence be offered. Instead the writer is likely to present a peace strategy that matches his theory of war causation. We shall therefore learn that we can have:

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