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Blowout Week 194

Blowout Week 194

Britain, France, Norway and India have already announced their intention to ban fossil-fuel-powered vehicles in favor of EVs and a number of other countries are considering it, and in this week’s Blowout we feature China, which is about to join the club. To follow we have the usual mix of energy-related stories from around the world, including Iraq facing civil war; Kurdistan’s referendum; things looking up in the N. Sea; PWRs in UK; Australia’s energy woes; nuclear in Japan, Poland, South Africa and Saudi Arabia; India’s power plants running out of coal; California’s clean energy proposals in trouble; the UK capacity auction; Trump to blame for Harvey and Irma; why lithium won’t win and how climate change could kill us all by 2100.

Bloomberg: China to end sales of fossil fuel vehicles

China, one-third of the world’s car market, is working on a timetable to end sales of fossil-fuel-based vehicles.

The announcement is important because the most influential players in the global auto market have always been not companies, but governments. Diesel cars make up about half of the market in the European Union and less than a percentage point in the U.S., largely because of different fuel-taxation and emissions regimes. Carburetors have been regulated out of most developed markets because fuel injection — originally a more costly technology — results in less tailpipe pollution. China’s auto industry plan released in April envisages new energy vehicles — including electric and hybrids — making up all the future sales growth in the country. With conventional cars plateauing at current levels, new-energy vehicle sales will reach 7 million annually in 2025. As many as 800,000 charging stations will be built this year alone, according to the official China Daily. Government mandates will require manufacturers to sell 8 percent of their vehicles with electric or hybrid powertrains from next year, or purchase credits to make up the difference, rising to 20 percent by 2025.

Oil Price: Iraq Faces Civil War Threat

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